Madison Magazine: Madison Public Market updates location plan


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December 19, 2018. There’s been talk of a public market in Madison for years. Mayor Paul Soglin moved the idea forward when he created the Public Market Development Committee to research a market in 2012. The city council approved the idea in 2015 with the original plan to move into the City Fleet Services building at 200 First St. The proposed location changed since then, but as of this month the current plan is back to the Fleet Services building.

While it may seem like a long time in the making, the market is making progress, says Jamaal Stricklin, president of the Madison Public Market Foundation Board. “It’s going. It’s happening,” says Stricklin, who also works as sales director at SuperCharge! Foods. “I would rather take our time and do it the right way than to rush the project.”

Dan Kennelly, city manager of the Office of Business Resources, agrees. “The Madison Public Market project is building momentum,” Kennelly says. “2018 has seen a lot of progress. This includes the Madison Public Market Foundation Board being formally selected by the city as the future operator of the market and launching a fundraising campaign that has raised nearly $1 million.” Kennelly also says the site change back to the location at the Fleet Services building — as opposed to a brand new building at the corner of East Washington Avenue and First Street — is positive. “The Fleet Building is a solidly built, 50-year-old facility that has been used to maintain large vehicles. The building is 45,000 square feet with three large garage bays, 20 foot high ceilings and big overhead garage doors. Reusing a big old garage will also result in a market that has unique character and architectural interest,” Kennelly says.

But while city council members have been hashing out details and architects have been drawing up plans, a group of 30 entrepreneurs — the heart and soul of the Madison Public Market, say its organizers — have been busy since 2017 creating business plans, purchasing equipment, touring other public markets and taking business classes with support from the city’s MarketReady Program.

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Wisconsin State Journal: Madison officials embrace Fleet Services building for Public Market


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December 4, 2018

With land costs too high to put a $13.2 million Madison Public Market on East Washington Avenue, city officials are embracing an option to reuse the nearby city Fleet Services building for the market.

Mayor Paul Soglin announced Monday that the city is dropping its bid to acquire land to build the market as part of a coming private redevelopment of the Washington Square shopping center at the corner of First Street and East Washington.

“A decision like this is a 100-year decision,” Soglin said at a press conference at the Fleet Services building Monday morning. “It’s very important we get it right.”

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WORT: 8 O’clock Buzz with Jamaal Stricklin & Carmell Jackson


November 20, 2018. MarketReady merchants Jamaal Stricklin (SuperCharge! Foods) and Carmell Jackson (Melly Mell’s Catering) sat down with 8 O’Clock Buzz host Haywood Simmons to talk about MarketReady’s holiday offerings and the Public Market development

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Wisconsin State Journal: Major gifts launch fundraising drive for Madison Public Market


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November 1, 2018. Donors have ignited a private fundraising campaign for the coming $13.2 million Madison Public Market on the East Side, pledging contributions totaling nearly $1 million for the project.

The law firm Boardman Clark is delivering a lead gift of $250,000, while Dairy Farmers of Wisconsin is providing another contribution to create an interactive space within the market highlighting dairy and the state’s rich heritage of cheesemaking.

Those gifts and a few others have the nonprofit Madison Public Market Foundation closing in on the first $1 million of an effort to privately raise $4 million for the project, which will be part of a larger redevelopment slated for land bounded by East Washington Avenue, North First Street and Burr Jones Park.

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Wisconsin State Journal: Know Your Madisonian: Former UW-Madison employee, longtime Public Market advocate sees project close to reality


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May 11, 2018. For more than 20 years Anne Reynolds made a career out of assisting cooperatives from nationally recognized brands, such as Ocean Spray, as well as local outlets such as Willy Street Co-op.

Although she retired as executive director of UW-Madison’s Center for Cooperatives in January, Reynolds remains busy with her involvement in the Madison Public Market project. She leads the city’s Public Market Development Committee, which is guiding development of the $11.8 million project planned at the intersection of East Washington Avenue and North First Street.

Reynolds, 64, also sits on the board of directors for the Madison Public Market Foundation, which is conducting private fundraising for the project and was recently selected to be the market’s operator when it opens as early as 2020.

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Wisconsin State Journal: Madison Public Market gives taste of its future offerings


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April 22, 2018. Artisan salami, salsa, scarves and muffins on display Saturday afternoon gave people a preview — or taste — of what to expect at the Madison Public Market.

While the market isn’t expected to open until 2020, hundreds of people sampled food and talked with 20 of the market’s planned vendors while listening to live music in an area of Madison Area Technical College’s Downtown campus far smaller the approximately 40,000 square feet shoppers will have to browse for locally produced food, beverages and other goods at the completed Madison Public Market.

Saturday’s “Taste of the Madison Public Market” was the third, and best attended, public market preview, said Mayra Medrano, president of the Madison Public Market Foundation Board.

“This really exceeded our expectations,” she said. “People are on board with the public market.”

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Cap Times: Will the Middleton and Madison public markets compete for customers?


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January 18, 2018. In just a few weeks, a proposed public market in Middleton could receive the approvals it needs to make the project a reality. If that happens, how will it stack up against the coming Madison Public Market?

Both projects will offer residential and retail space in addition to a market, where vendors will set up in stalls to sell locally sourced food and other goods. Despite their similarities, the city of Madison and the developer of the Middleton project think the markets will be complementary, rather than competitive.

“Public markets can vary. We call them public markets and generalize them as an open space with a multitude of vendors,” said Mayra Medrano, president of Madison’s Public Market Foundation. “(They) can be different and should be different.”

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Wisconsin State Journal: Food Innovation Center can boost availability of local foods in region


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September 24, 2017. If a vibrant Market Hall filled with vendors, events and music delivers the pizzazz to the Madison Public Market, the adjacent Food Innovation Center offers enormous potential to increase the availability of local foods throughout the region, supporters say.

The three-story, 15,000- square-foot food-processing facility and training center for food-based workers will be attached to the market.

The innovation center will include food processing and storage capacities to meet the needs of vendors in the market, but also include larger-scale food-processing opportunities focused on getting more local food to bigger buyers, city business manager Daniel Kennelly said.

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